Fish Species - Germany

Cod (Gadus morhua)

© Scandinavian Fishing Year Book

 

Physiology and size:

Cod have a big head with a barbel, and three dorsal and two anal fins. The ventral fin is jugular. The fish are brown marbled, and their lateral organ appears as a white line.

Habitat and biology:

For commercial and recreational fishery, cod is one of the most important species in the Baltic Sea. Several distinct stocks exist with different spawning and feeding migration behaviours. This species lives near the ground and feeds on fish like herring, sprat and sand eel, as well as on crustaceans and other invertebrates. They are pelagic spawners and the development of the larvae is highly dependent on the salinity and oxygen content of the water.

Minimum size and conservation periods:

At 40–60 cm long, cod can be caught easily in the Baltic Sea around Mecklenburg Western-Pomerania, but catches of individuals up to 1 m are becoming increasingly rare. If you are fishing for cod, be aware of the minimum size (35 cm) and the bag limit for this species: 5 fish per day from April to January, but only 3 fish per day in the closed season from 1 February to 31 March.

Flounder (Platichthys flesus)

© Scandinavian Fishing Year Book

 

Physiology and size:

In general, the flounder is the most common flatfish for recreational fishing in the Baltic Sea around Mecklenburg Western-Pomerania. But dab (Limanda limanda), plaice (Pleuronectes platessa) and other flatfish species can also be caught in this area. Flounder have a flat, oval body and a rough, spiny skin. The lateral organ is slightly curved, and the edge of the caudal fin is straight.

Habitat and biology:

Flounder often live close to the coast, also in brackish water, and sometimes they even migrate into the bordering rivers. This species likes sandy grounds and spawns between January and May. The eggs are pelagic, and the larvae soon get their typical asymmetric shape. Worms, shrimps, isopods, mussels and small fish serve as prey.

Minimum size and conservation periods:

The minimum size for flounder, dab and plaice is 25 cm. Flounder can be caught all year round.

Season:

Even though flounder can be caught all year round, summer and autumn are the main seasons. They are nocturnal animals, yet they can also be caught during the day. For surfcasting, twilight and night are the best times.

Sea trout (Salmo trutta)

© Scandinavian Fishing Year Book

 

Physiology and size:

Sea trout have a torpedo-like body, and the upper jaw reaches behind the eye. Except during the spawning season, the skin is silver with dark spots, even below the lateral organ. They have an adipose fin, and the edge of the caudal fin is straight.

Habitat and biology:

Sea trout is an anadromous migratory fish species, spawning in the rivers. Young individuals feed on insect larvae and small fish. After migration to the sea, crustaceans, shrimp, bristle worms and fish like sand eel or herring serve as prey. Often coastal waters that offer a variation of sand, aquatic plants and stones or areas close to estuaries are chosen as habitats.

Minimum size and conservation periods:

The minimum size for this species is 45 cm, and the bag limit is 3 salmonids – sea trout and salmon together – per day. The closed season for sea trout extends from 15 September to 14 December.

Season:

As water temperatures rise in spring, the chances of catching sea trout close to the coast of Mecklenburg Western-Pomerania are high. In winter, often fishing from a boat is the most successful way. The average length is about 40–70 cm, but also individuals bigger than 90 cm can be caught.

Pike (Esox lucius)

© Scandinavian Fishing Year Book

 

Physiology and size:

Pike have an elongated, torpedo-like body, a long, flat head and an upturned mouth with sharp teeth. The dorsal and anal fins are situated close to the caudal fin, which helps them ambush predators and to attack their prey very fast. Fish, but also invertebrates, amphibians, mammals and even birds, may serve as prey.

Habitat and biology:

In spring, pike migrate to shallow areas or flooded marshes to spawn. In autumn and winter, they often migrate to deeper areas. Pike live in fresh water, but also in the brackish lagoons along Mecklenburg Western-Pomerania, especially in areas with vegetation and a relatively high water transparency. The bay of Greifswald is inhabited by one of the greatest pike populations in Europe. Due to the osmotic conditions and the large-scale feeding possibilities, fish get quite big at an early age. Catches of pike longer than 1 m are not uncommon and even bigger ones up to 1.40 m can be caught in the coastal lagoons.

Minimum size and conservation periods:

The minimum size for pike in coastal waters is 50 cm and the closed season extends from 1 March to 30 April. The bag limit is 3 fish per day.

Pikeperch (Sander lucioperca)

© Scandinavian Fishing Year Book

 

Physiology and size:

Pikeperch have a long spindle-shaped body, big eyes and two dorsal fins. The anterior fin has hard, spiny rays. The scales are ctenoid.

Habitat and biology:

Pikeperch spawn mainly in April and May. The eggs are often attached to branches, roots or plants, and afterwards protected by the males. Aggressive territoriality can be observed during this time. The main sources of food are other fish or conspecifics. Pikeperch live in fresh water, but also in the brackish lagoons along Mecklenburg Western-Pomerania, especially in areas with high turbidity and structured grounds.

Minimum size and conservation periods:

The minimum size for pikeperch in coastal waters is 45 cm (40 cm within the fishing districts of Darßer Boddenkette, Peenestrom and the German part of the Szczecin Lagoon). The closed season extends from 23 April to 22 May. The bag limit is 3 fish per day.

Season:

Early summer and autumn are good times for fishing. Because of the high turbidity of the water, this species can be caught in the coastal waters even on sunny days.

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close